young people

The Key Club for young people with Autistic Spectrum Conditions (ASC)

The Key Club for young people with Autistic Spectrum Conditions (ASC)
The Key Club for young people with Autistic Spectrum Conditions (ASC)
The Key Club for young people with Autistic Spectrum Conditions (ASC)

The Key Club was devised and created by Turtle Key Arts in 2003 as a response to the lack of creative activities available to young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders following the end of full time education and support from schools and colleges. At the point of transition to adulthood, aged 16 – 30 years old, during this we time we provide continuity, social contact with peers and a creative project to inspire.

Object learning and its impact on wellbeing and confidence in pupils with SEND in partnership with Leeds Museums and Galleries

Artwork produced by pupils during project

Funding:

This action research was a part of the SLiCE (Specialist Leaders in Cultural Education) programme funded by Arts Council England through the regional bridge organisation for Yorkshire and Humber, CapeUK.

Timescales and delivery dates:

This was a year-long process between West Oaks School and Leeds Museums and Galleries (LMG) starting in June 2015 and ending in June 2016. Delivery of the arts programme took place between September 2015 and May 2016.

Project Management:

Artfelt Workshop Programme

Artfelt Workshop Programme

Artfelt, the arts programme at Sheffield Children’s Hospital, has two primary streams of work. The Artfelt Workshop Programme sits alongside our commissioning work in using art to make hospital feel better. Overseen by our Workshop Coordinator, this two day a week project sees a variety of visual arts, crafts and music sessions made available to patients during their time at Sheffield Children’s Hospital.

Make Your Mark

Make Your Mark

‘Piloting the use of Arts Award in therapeutic work with children and young people’ By Joanna Stevens, former Lead for Arts Therapies at Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, and Cindy Cox and Catherine Orbach, Co-Directors, Culture Shift.
In June 2013, Sussex Partnership held an introductory session on Arts Award for 25 health professionals in collaboration with Culture Shift. Participants’ feedback confirmed they saw using Arts Award in mental health practice as a valid area of enquiry and practice development.

Assessment of the impact of arts on learning

The Cultural Learning Alliance has published key findings demonstrating the impact of the arts on the social and educational achievements of children and young people.

Dynamix first year evaluation

Dynamix is a music and health programme developed and delivered by Sound It Out to four Child & Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) wards at the Birmingham Children’s Hospital.

Dynamix provides access to practical music making for children and young people experiencing mental health conditions. The pilot project involved young inpatients, some of whom had been resident for up to one year.

Assessment of the impact of arts on learning

Organisation: 
The Cultural Learning Alliance

The Cultural Learning Alliance has published key findings demonstrating the impact of the arts on the social and educational achievements of children and young people.

Go Dance Project studies Dance and Psychological Behaviour in school children

After undertaking Continuing Professional Development (CPD) training, three dance artists from across the East of England devised dance sessions for school children in Year 6, aged 10 - 11. Creative in nature, these sessions focused on addressing the physiological fitness components of flexibility, aerobic endurance and muscular explosive power.

The aim of this project was to study children’s behaviour and the positive effect of creative dance sessions in schools.

The Impact of Creative Partnerships on the Wellbeing of Children and Young People

Organisation: 
University of Cambridge

Authors: Ros McLellan, Maurice Galton, Susan Steward and Charlotte Page, University of Cambridge

This study aimed to explore how the Creative Partnerships programme had affected student wellbeing and the degree to which creative approaches had become embedded in areas of the curriculum other than those directly involving creative practitioners.

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Supported using public funding by the Arts Council England