singing

The RHN Staff Choir

The RHN Staff Choir

Aims & Objectives

The staff choir aims to promote the social, emotional and physical health of its’ members. It aims to maintain positive rapport and morale within the workplace setting. The primary goals of the project are to:  

 

The multi-disciplinary music group in neuro-rehabilitation: addressing therapy goals in a creative setting

RHN Logo

Aims & Objectives Within this multi-faceted group, the aims of the group are:

  • To encourage use of upper and lower limbs with musical instruments and sensory aids.
  • To encourage choice making, verbalisation, attention and focus and social interaction.

Contact Details

Rosanne Tyas rtyas@rhn.org.uk Royal Hospital for Neuro-disabilty (RHN) www.rhn.org.uk

Funding Sources

Partly funded by the RHN Charity and NHS funding via some AHP therapists.

Intervention Timescale

Plymouth Music Zone

Plymouth Music Zone logo
Barbara singing, Plymouth Music Zone
CD Digifile Back, Plymouth Music Zone
CD Digifile Front, Plymouth Music Zone
David Clarke with microphone and earphones, Plymouth Music Zone
Plymouth Music Zone

Plymouth Music Zone is a highly regarded multi-award winning community music charity that uses the power of music to reach out to some of the most vulnerable or marginalised individuals supported within health, social care, education and community settings.  The organisation engages up to 1000 people every week with over 60 weekly music activities. It also brings people together through special projects, events and specialised training. It aims to reduce loneliness and isolation and improve people’s skills, emotional wellbeing and social connectedness.

Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of community singing on mental health-related quality of life of older people: randomised controlled trial

Organisation: 
The Royal College of Psychiatrists

Background
As the population ages, older people account for a greater proportion of the health and social care budget. Whereas some research has been conducted on the use of music therapy for specific clinical populations, little rigorous research has been conducted looking at the value of community singing on the mental health-related quality of life of older people.

Aims
To evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of community group singing for a population of older people in England.

Method

The Contribution of Community Singing Groups to the Well-Being of Older People: Participant Perspectives From the United Kingdom

Organisation: 
Southern Gerontological Society

Current evidence suggests that participatory arts activities, and particularly group singing, may contribute to the well-being of older people. However, there is currently a paucity of prospective research from the participant perspective. This qualitative study nested within a randomized controlled trial aimed to assess participants’ perspectives of the acceptability and effect on health and well-being of a community singing program for older people.

Why Singing in a Choir is Good for You

Organisation: 
Oxford Brookes University
Singing in a choir can be good for our psychological well-being. Researchers set up an online study asking 375 people who sang in choirs, sang alone or were members of sports teams about their experience of these activities. All three leisure activities yielded high levels of well-being, but the analysis of the results revealed statistically significant, evidence of higher reported well-being in people who sang with a choir compared to those who sang alone.

Singing4Health CIC

Name: 
Singing4Health CIC
Contact name: 
Maria Soriano
Telephone: 
0208 274 0075
Email address: 
Email contact form
About: 
Singing4Health is a Community Interest Company that promotes physical. mental and social well-being through musical activities, primarily centred in singing. We aim to create sustainable singing activities for a wide range of beneficiaries, with a health related approach. Singing4Health organizes community choirs, voice workshops and activities related to singing with a very special focus on community building, integration, and promotion of tolerance.
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Supported using public funding by the Arts Council England