Guidelines

Arts for health and wellbeing An evaluation framework

Organisation: 
Aesop and Public Health England

Aesop and Public Health England has published a framework for evaluating arts activities designed to support health and wellbeing.

The document aims to “strengthen understanding of what works in specific contexts and enable realistic assessment and appropriate comparisons to be made between programmes.”

And is intended for:

Arts on Prescription Fact Sheet

Organisation: 
Arts & Health South West
Arts & Health South West Fact Sheets provide you with a summary of information on a given subject based on a Frequently Asked Questions format. They also provide you with signposting for further research. - See more at: http://www.ahsw.org.uk/page.aspx?p=133#sthash.3eXNHs4Y.dpuf

Bringing the arts to life: a guide to the arts and long-term care

Organisation: 
Global Alliance for the Arts in Health (US); IDEAS Institute

This latest resource from the Global Alliance for Arts & Health, published in partnership with IDEAS Institute and The Hulda B. & Maurice L. Rothschild Foundation, provides examples of how the arts in long-term care communities can play a key role in person-centered care by engaging older adults in the artistic process.

A Guide to Evaluation for Arts Therapists and Arts & Health Practitioners

Organisation: 
Nordoff Robbins

Evaluation is crucial to the development and sustainability of Arts Therapy and Arts & Health practices.

This guide supports practitioners in their quest to integrate thorough evaluation procedures in their everyday practices by providing practical guidance for designing, planning and implementing bespoke evaluation projects.

Sustaining the note of hope: music, dementia and meaningful lives

Organisation: 
National Alliance for Arts, Health & Wellbeing; Rayne Foundation

Report from the ‘Music & Dementia’ seminar, 18 November 2013, hosted by The Rayne Foundation and the National Alliance for Arts Health & Wellbeing.

The report draws on the presentations, discussions and stories from a creative multidisciplinary seminar in order to:

Arts in Health: a new prognosis

Organisation: 
Ixia

In recent years the arts in health field has acquired the expertise to address a wide spectrum of medical, health and social care issues.  It has the resilience and resourcefulness to weather the impending health service reforms in an era of austerity. But it will need to adapt conceptually and in delivery to healthcare environments in which patient choice, GP commissioning power and a new public health workforce are the drivers of change.

Department of Health building notes

Organisation: 
Department of Health (UK)

Health building notes give best practice guidance on the design and planning of new healthcare buildings and on the adaptation/extension of existing facilities.

They provide information to support the briefing and design processes for individual projects in the NHS building programme.

(For reference - April 2014, LAHF website:

The Role of Culture & Sport in Health & Wellbeing

Organisation: 
Chief Cultural & Leisure Officers Association; National Leisure & Culture Forum

The Chief Cultural and Leisure Officers Association has posted its guide to best practice in local authority engagement in arts and health. The organisation has produced a brochure showcasing a range of local authority arts in health case studies from across the country highlighting the benefits to public health of commissioning arts and leisure activity.

Wellbeing: A Complete Reference Guide, Volume VI, Interventions and Policies to Enhance Wellbeing

Using an evidence-based approach and case studies from a wide range of life domains, Interventions and Policies to Enhance Wellbeing examines the most successful existing strategies to promote wellbeing and mental health.

 

Working in the Arts with Young People at Risk, Artswork

The kit contains four sets of practical guidelines: ‘Using the Arts with Young People at Risk’; ‘Access All Areas: Disability and Youth Arts’; ‘Using the Arts with Juvenile and Young Offenders’ and ‘Using the Arts with Young Asylum Seek

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Supported using public funding by the Arts Council England